ADD

  • food additives

    Recently there has been a lot of media attention on food additives and how they affect mood. Food additives are used to preserve, colour and flavour foods. Some are harmless, in fact some are even beneficial. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is used to preserve food and lecithin, which is involved in fat metabolism and the conduction of nerve impulses, is used as an emulsifier. Many however are not only harmful but some are actually carcinogenic, i.e. promote cancer. Food Standards Australia and New Zealand (FSANZ) conducted a study into people’s diets and found that Australian pre-schoolers are consuming almost double the amount of preservatives and additives than the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends. These are linked with asthma, eczema, hay fever and other allergic disorders and behavioural disorders such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Irish kids have a similar diet.

  • ADHD

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD or AD/HD or ADD) is a developmental disorder. It is primarily characterised by "the co-existence of attentional problems and hyperactivity, with each behavior occurring infrequently alone" and symptoms starting before seven years of age.  ADHD management usually involves some combination of medications, behaviour modifications, lifestyle changes, and counselling. Its symptoms can be difficult to differentiate from other disorders, increasing the likelihood that the diagnosis of ADHD will be missed. Most clinicians have not received formal training in the assessment and treatment of ADHD, particularly in adult patients. However herbal medicine, nutritional supplementation, dietary and lifestyle approaches can treat this condition naturally, without the use of pharmacological drugs.